what are you reading?

ploverwing

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The narrator's voice and inflection is a huge factor.
Oh my, an audiobook lives or dies by the narrator's ability. I have some books that I love to read, they're absolute favourites, and then I listened to a sample of the audiobook and thought that was the most disinteresting and disappointing thing I'd ever heard, thankfully I had read the book and not been first introduced to it through audiobook. I find that it can frequently (but not always) be the case that an author should not narrate their own book; I can't tell you how many self-narrated books I just couldn't tolerate. There are many. Stephen Fry, however, is a stellar exception to that rule, in my opinion, even if he is a bit of a pompous ass at times, he's an entertaining pompous ass.
 

Joyful Uke

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Just finished Paul Pringle's Bad City, which was a good read for me.

I'm now partway through Annie Jacobsen's Area 51, which is interesting, but maybe not interesting enough for me to keep going with it. I'm about 1/4 of the way through and already thinking about what else I could be reading instead. Not a good sign for me finishing it, but I could see why others might find it fascinating.

Audiobooks: The narrator totally makes a difference. I usually check the samples on Amazon and decide if I want to put a hold on something at the library based on that. There is one recently I thought I wanted, but the sample convinced me that I'd not be able to tolerate listening to it. I'm not sure the library had it anyway. But they're great to listen to while cooking, eating, and other tasks where hands aren't able to hold a book. The library has a decent selection.
 

LukuleleStrings

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I tandem-read where I’ll listen to audiobooks when I’m commuting, running, or doing something with my hands like mowing or cross-stitching. But at the end of the day when I’m trying to settle down, I’ll pull out either the physical book I’m borrowing from the library or bought if it wasn’t available or sometimes my kindle, though I’m really trying to limit my screen time.

Sometimes audio books make for a better delivery of the story. Stephen King’s “Blockade Billy,” and “Dolores Claiborne,” are both monologue books so it feels natural to listen to them rather than read the transcription.

I love them (audio books),
 

TimWilson

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...my kindle, though I’m really trying to limit my screen time.

I have a Kindle Paperwhite that really, truly does go easy on my eyes. No blue light, so I can also read it before bed -- a big deal because I'm otherwise hyper-sensitive to blue light.

I also dig that it's lightweight (much lighter than a paperback book), and the lack of apps means that it's ONLY good for reading. And my library checks out ebooks for Kindle (and other devices), so I'm not limited to the books I've bought.
 
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Arcy

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I find that it can frequently (but not always) be the case that an author should not narrate their own book;
Neil Gaiman is another who has done excellent narrations of their own books. I only listen to audio books of things I've already read and liked, as I don't focus enough on just the audio to follow the narrative, and I've definitely had the same experience of a bad reader completely throwing me out of the book. On the flip side, a great reader elevates the story and provides a whole new experience.

Almost all of my reading these days is electronic - kindle by the bed, synced to my phone on the run.

Current book is Brandon Sanderson's The Lost Alloy, following a re-read of the rest of the Mistborn Era 2 series that it completes. I re-read them in the wrong order though, since I had #2 and #3 on Kindle and #1 in iBooks (I think I downloaded it from Tor), and the second one is self contained enough it took me a bit to realize I was remembering things that had previously happened not which were going to happen. Oops.

Next up is Nine Nasty Words by John McWhorter . McWhorter narrates his own books, and I expect he's a good reader. He used to have a fantastic podcast (Lexicon Valley).
 
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ploverwing

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Reading "Killers of a Certain Age" by Deanna Raybourn and loving it so far. I think it was the only thing by her in our library, or maybe our library has one of her series but not from the beginning? I can't recall now, I just order and they come when the come, and I read them when they arrive, lol. Anyway, thanks for the author recommendation off this thread, it's a great read thus far.

Also listening to "Leviathan Wakes" by James S. A. Corey. It moves pretty well, too. I did a search for recommendations of audiobooks for people who enjoyed "Artemis" by Andy Weir.
 

ploverwing

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I have a Kindle Paperwhite that really, truly does go easy on my eyes. No blue light, so I can also read it before bed -- a big deal because I'm otherwise hyper-sensitive to blue light.

I also dig that it's lightweight (much lighter than a paperback book), and the lack of apps means that it's ONLY good for reading. And my library checks out ebooks for Kindle (and other devices), so I'm not limited to the books I've bought.
I have a Kobo reader from years ago that's similar. I still prefer to read an actual book, but sometimes it's good, like for classics, but I don't read a lot of contemporary stuff digitally, unless it's something I really want to read and there's no hardcopy available at the library (read "No Country for Old Men" that way).
 

LukuleleStrings

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I just finished “Get A Life, Chloe Brown.” It’s a contemporary romance that was really good. None of that too-shallow Hallmark stuff and more than a couple spicy scenes. ;-)

Three more books and I’ll call my heat a success!
 

Joyful Uke

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Just started Dave Grohl's "The Storyteller". I've never bought any of his music, (yes, I buy music vs. streaming), but he seems very well liked in the music industry. I got it from the library as an audiobook, and he narrates it. My goodness, he's had lots of serious injuries.
 

TheBathBird

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Just finished Stephen King’s Fairy Tale. Loved it. But tbh I’d happily read King’s shopping lists, he’s such an engaging writer.
 

LukuleleStrings

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Just started Dave Grohl's "The Storyteller". I've never bought any of his music, (yes, I buy music vs. streaming), but he seems very well liked in the music industry. I got it from the library as an audiobook, and he narrates it. My goodness, he's had lots of serious injuries.
If you haven’t checked out his documentaries, they’re SUPER good. Sound City covers the history of a recording studio and is wildly interesting and Sonic Highways was an experiment where the Foo Fighters went to different studios around the country, soaked up the vibe, and recorded a song there. I don’t think it was as good as Sound City, but each episode is basically a mini-documentary about the music scene attached to the city like DC’s love of hardcore, punk, and funk or Nashville’s country angle, but the best is the Austin episode where they briefly touch on how the gentrification of Austin is destroying the reason people like Austin in the first place. Fancy people are getting condos downtown because it’s cool to live in downtown Austin, then calling the cops because the musicians that make downtown Austin such a cool place are too loud.

Fascinating stuff!
 

LukuleleStrings

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Just finished Stephen King’s Fairy Tale. Loved it. But tbh I’d happily read King’s shopping lists, he’s such an engaging writer.
I liked almost all of that book and the pages FLEW by! I thought the sex scene was unnecessary and kind of awkwardly tacked on to such an extent that I thought MAYBE it was a critique on how that situation - the hero is owed a girl upon completion of the dangerous quest - was ALWAYS unnecessary and tacked on.

At least, I’m hoping so! ;-)
 

TheBathBird

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I liked almost all of that book and the pages FLEW by! I thought the sex scene was unnecessary and kind of awkwardly tacked on to such an extent that I thought MAYBE it was a critique on how that situation - the hero is owed a girl upon completion of the dangerous quest - was ALWAYS unnecessary and tacked on.

At least, I’m hoping so! ;-)
Urgh, couldn’t agree more about that scene. I really think SK should steer clear of sex scenes altogether, he’s just horrible at them. The worst example must be the one with the kids towards the end of “It”, what the hell was he thinking?!?

I love your idea about it being a critique on the hero getting the girl though, maybe we should give him the benefit of the doubt on this occasion!